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Dr José Silva

Dr José Silva
Department of Biochemistry
Office Phone: 01223 760282

Biography:

The Silva lab research is centred on the biology of nuclear reprogramming, that is, the conversion of a differentiated epigenome back into a pluripotent epigenome. In the mouse system this corresponds to the generation of induced naive pluripotent cells. This process has a parallel to normal embryonic development, more precisely to the establishment of the naive pluripotent epiblast. In vivo, naive pluripotent cells give rise to all cell types of the adult animal. The Silva lab has developed a unique cell system to better investigate the process of induced naive pluripotency. This cell system is comprised of different and key cell state transitions which are unveiling surprising and exciting new discoveries on the biology of defined factors. Examples of these were the identification of Nanog and of the culture environment as key players for the establishment of a naive pluripotent cell state. Our current research focus not only on identifying further key players but also on determining the molecular mechanisms by which these work. Fully understanding induced pluripotency and better characterising iPS and ES cells is indispensible before these can be used in biomedical applications.

Termination details:

The Silva lab research is centred on the biology of nuclear reprogramming, that is, the conversion of a differentiated epigenome back into a pluripotent epigenome. In the mouse system this corresponds to the generation of induced naive pluripotent cells. This process has a parallel to normal embryonic development, more precisely to the establishment of the naive pluripotent epiblast. In vivo, naive pluripotent cells give rise to all cell types of the adult animal. The Silva lab has developed a unique cell system to better investigate the process of induced naive pluripotency. This cell system is comprised of different and key cell state transitions which are unveiling surprising and exciting new discoveries on the biology of defined factors. Examples of these were the identification of Nanog and of the culture environment as key players for the establishment of a naive pluripotent cell state. Our current research focus not only on identifying further key players but also on determining the molecular mechanisms by which these work. Fully understanding induced pluripotency and better characterising iPS and ES cells is indispensible before these can be used in biomedical applications.